Coaching

The Six-Question Process

The Six-Question process for coaching is an approach that I have seen work consistently well with senior executives. This process has produced measurable change in effectiveness (as evaluated by direct reports) with five CEOs that I have personally coached. In my work with senior leaders, I have found that one of the most common complaints…

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Change for the Better

Most of any leader’s annoying habits and interpersonal flaws are rooted in information compulsion. Sharing and withholding are two sides of the same tarnished coin. For example, when you insist on adding more value, passing judgment, making destructive comments, announcing that you already know, or explaining why something won’t work, you are compulsively sharing information–…

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How to differentiate yourself as a coach

What do clients really want? One of the biggest challenges for coaches is the lack of clarity and transparency in the leadership development marketplace.  Anyone can call themselves a coach, and they use accreditations to differentiate themselves.  This makes it difficult for clients to understand your uniqueness – and consequently makes it difficult to choose…

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You Spoke, But No One Listened

One of the great causes of corporate dysfunction is the glaring gap between “I say” and “they do.” It’s a huge mistake to assume that just because people understand, then they will do. A few years ago, I saw a doctor for back problems. After running a few tests, the doctor sat me down and…

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The Biggest Challenge Facing Executives

There’s a reason I devote so much energy to addressing interpersonal challenges in successful business people: The higher up they go, the more their problems are behavioral. At the top levels of an organization, all of the players are technically skilled. They’re all very smart, and they are up to date on the key concepts…

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4 Commitments to Improve Leadership (and make it permanent)

Most of any leader’s annoying habits and interpersonal flaws are rooted in information compulsion. Sharing and withholding are two sides of the same tarnished coin. For example, when you insist on adding more value, passing judgment, making destructive comments, announcing that you already know, or explaining why something won’t work, you are compulsively sharing information convinced…

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2 Great Lessons for Behavioral Coaches

As a Ph.D. student at UCLA in the early 1970s, I had a self-image of being “hip” and “cool.” I believed I was intensely involved in deep human understanding, self-actualization, and the uncovering of profound wisdom. Early in my Ph.D. program, I was one of thirteen students in a class led by a wise teacher,…

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12 Storytelling Secrets Great Coaches Use

We all love a great story.  Great stories can take us on emotional journeys of excitement, anger, love, despair – and can live on for centuries. For thousands of years people have been moved by tales told around campfires, at bedsides, in theatres, in public squares… and today on YouTube, Facebook, etc. The medium doesn’t…

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